Vitamin and mineral supplements

If your anemia or nutritional deficiencies are severe, your doctor or dietitian might recommend that you take supplements, including:

  • Copper
  • Folate
  • Iron
  • Vitamin B-12
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin K
  • Zinc

Vitamins and supplements are usually taken in pill form. If your digestive tract has trouble absorbing vitamins, your doctor might give them by injection.

Follow-up care

Medical follow-up at regular intervals can ensure that your symptoms have responded to a gluten-free diet. Your doctor will monitor your response with blood tests.

For most people with celiac disease, a gluten-free diet will allow the small intestine to heal. For children, that usually takes three to six months. For adults, complete healing might take several years.

If you continue to have symptoms or if symptoms recur, you might need an endoscopy with biopsies to determine whether your intestine has healed

Allowed foods

Many basic foods are allowed in a gluten-free diet, including:

  • Eggs
  • Fresh meats, fish and poultry that aren’t breaded, batter-coated or marinated
  • Fruits
  • Lentils
  • Most dairy products, unless they make your symptoms worse
  • Nuts
  • Potatoes
  • Vegetables
  • Wine and distilled liquors, ciders and spirits
  • Grains and starches allowed in a glutenfree diet include:
  • Amaranth
  • Buckwheat
  • Corn
  • Cornmeal
  • Gluten-free flours (rice, soy, corn, potato, bean)
  • Pure corn tortillas
  • Quinoa
  • Rice
  • Tapioca
  • Wild rice

Dr. Pargat Singh Bhurji
MD,FRCP ( C ) Consultant Pediatrician Surrery BC